Main AHCA Website

AHCA’s main website for information on Medicaid, Health Quality Assurance and the Florida Center for Health Information and Transparency.

Go >

Florida Health Information Network

This website provides information and resources relating to AHCA’s initiatives for Health Information Technology and Health Information Exchange.

Go >


FloridaHealthFinder.gov

Provides health education and information to compare and locate health care providers in Florida to make well-informed health care decisions.

Go >
AHCA Network of Websites

Health Education


Health Encyclopedia

Search the Health Encyclopedia

Ovulation home test

Definition

An ovulation home test is used by women to help determine the time in the menstrual cycle when getting pregnant is most likely.

The test detects a rise in luteinizing hormone (LH) in the urine. A rise in this hormone signals the ovary to release the egg. This at-home test is often used by women to help predict when an egg release is likely. This is when pregnancy is most likely to occur.

These kits can be bought at most drug stores.

Alternative Names

Luteinizing hormone urine test (home test); Ovulation prediction test; Urinary LH immunoassays; At-home ovulation prediction test; LH urine test

How the Test is Performed

Ovulation prediction test kits most often come with five to seven sticks. You may need to test for several days to detect a surge in LH.

The specific time of month that you start testing depends on the length of your menstrual cycle. For example, if your normal cycle is 28 days, you'll need to test on day 11. (That is, the 11th day after you started your period.)

You will need to urinate on the test stick, or place the stick into urine that has been collected into a sterile container. The test stick will turn a certain color or display a positive sign if a surge is detected.

A positive result means you should ovulate in the next 24 to 36 hours, but this may not be the case for all women. The booklet that is included in the kit will tell you how to read the results.

You may miss your surge if you miss a day of testing. You may also not be able to detect a surge if you have an irregular menstrual cycle.

How to Prepare for the Test

DO NOT drink large amounts of fluids before using the test.

Drugs that can decrease LH measurements include estrogens, progesterone and testosterone. Estrogens and progesterone may be found in birth control pills and hormone replacement therapy.

The drug clomiphene citrate (Clomid) can increase LH levels. This drug is used to help trigger ovulation.

How the Test will Feel

The test involves normal urination. There is no pain or discomfort.

Why the Test is Performed

This test is most often done to determine when a women will ovulate. For women with a 28-day menstrual cycle, this release normally occurs between days 11 and 14.

If you have an irregular menstrual cycle, the kit can help you tell when you are ovulating.

The ovulation home test may also be used to help you adjust doses of certain medicines.

Normal Results

A positive result indicates an "LH surge." This is a sign that ovulation may soon occur.

Risks

Rarely, false positive results can occur. This means the test kit may falsely predict ovulation.

Considerations

Talk to your health care provider if you are unable to detect a surge or do not become pregnant after using the kit for several months. You may need to see an infertility specialist.

LH urine tests are not the same as at home fertility monitors. Fertility monitors are digital handheld devices. They predict ovulation based on electrolyte levels in saliva, LH levels in urine, or your basal body temperature. These devices can store ovulation information for several menstrual cycles.

References

Borawski D, Bluth MH. Reproductive function and pregnancy. In: McPherson RA, Pincus MR, eds. Henry's Clinical Diagnosis and Management by Laboratory Methods. 22nd ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier Saunders; 2011:chap 25.

Falcone T. Women's health. In: Carey WD, ed. Cleveland Clinic: Current Clinical Medicine 2010. 2nd ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier Saunders; 2010:section 14.

Review Date:5/9/2015
Reviewed By:Cynthia D. White, MD, Fellow American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists, Group Health Cooperative, Bellevue, WA. Also reviewed by David Zieve, MD, MHA, Isla Ogilvie, PhD, and the A.D.A.M. Editorial team.

The information provided herein should not be used during any medical emergency or for the diagnosis or treatment of any medical condition. A licensed medical professional should be consulted for diagnosis and treatment of any and all medical conditions. Call 911 for all medical emergencies. Links to other sites are provided for information only -- they do not constitute endorsements of those other sites. © 1997-A.D.A.M., Inc. Any duplication or distribution of the information contained herein is strictly prohibited.

adam.com

The Agency for Health Care Administration (Agency) and this website do not claim the information on, or referred to by, this site is error free. This site may include links to websites of other government agencies or private groups. Our Agency and this website do not control such sites and are not responsible for their content. Reference to or links to any other group, product, service, or information does not mean our Agency or this website approves of that group, product, service, or information.

Additionally, while health information provided through this website may be a valuable resource for the public, it is not designed to offer medical advice. Talk with your doctor about medical care questions you may have.

Health
Outcome Data

No data available for this condition/procedure.

Health Encyclopedia

More Features

We Appreciate Your Feedback
1. Did you find this information useful?
         Yes
         No

2. Would you recommend this website to family and friends?
         Yes
         No