Skip to main content

Health Encyclopedia

Search the Health Encyclopedia

Tendon repair

Definition

Tendon repair is surgery to repair damaged or torn tendons.

Alternative Names

Repair of tendon

Description

Tendon repairs can often be done in an outpatient setting. Hospital stays, if any, are short.

Tendon repair can be performed using:

  • Local anesthesia (immediate area of the surgery is pain-free)
  • Regional anesthesia (local and surrounding areas are pain-free)
  • General anesthesia (asleep and pain-free)

The surgeon makes a cut on the skin over the injured tendon. The damaged or torn ends of the tendon are sewn together.

If the tendon has been severely injured, a tendon graft may be needed.

  • In this case, a piece of tendon from the foot, toe, or another part of the body is often used.
  • If needed, tendons are reattached to the surrounding tissue.
  • The surgeon examines the area to see if there are any injuries to nerves and blood vessels.
  • When the repair is complete, the wound is closed.

If the tendon damage is too severe, the repair and reconstruction may have to be done at different times. The surgeon will perform one surgery to repair part of the injury. Another surgery will be done at a later time to finish repairing the tendon.

Why the Procedure Is Performed

The goal of tendon repair is to bring back normal function of joints or surrounding tissues a tendon injury or tear.

Risks

Risks of anesthesia and surgery in general include:

  • Reactions to medicines, breathing problems
  • Bleeding, blood clots, infection

Risks of this procedure include:

  • Scar tissue that prevents smooth movements
  • Pain that does not go away
  • Partial loss of function in the involved joint
  • Stiffness of the joint
  • The tendon tears again

After the Procedure

Healing may take 6 to 12 weeks. During that time:

  • The injured part may need to be kept in a splint or cast. Later, a brace that allows movement may be used.
  • You'll be taught exercises to help the tendon heal and limit scar tissue.

Outlook (Prognosis)

Most tendon repairs are successful with proper and continued physical therapy.

References

Cannon DL. Flexor and extensor tendon injuries. In: Canale ST, Beaty JH, eds. Campbell's Operative Orthopaedics. 12th ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier Mosby; 2013:chap 66.

Irwin TA. Tendon injuries of the foot and ankle. In: Miller MD, Thompson SR, eds. DeLee and Drez's Orthopaedic Sports Medicine. 4th ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier Saunders; 2015:chap 117.

Review Date:9/22/2016
Reviewed By:C. Benjamin Ma, MD, Professor, Chief, Sports Medicine and Shoulder Service, UCSF Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, San Francisco, CA. Also reviewed by David Zieve, MD, MHA, Isla Ogilvie, PhD, and the A.D.A.M. Editorial team.

The information provided herein should not be used during any medical emergency or for the diagnosis or treatment of any medical condition. A licensed medical professional should be consulted for diagnosis and treatment of any and all medical conditions. Call 911 for all medical emergencies. Links to other sites are provided for information only -- they do not constitute endorsements of those other sites. © 1997-A.D.A.M., Inc. Any duplication or distribution of the information contained herein is strictly prohibited.

adam.com

The Agency for Health Care Administration (Agency) and this website do not claim the information on, or referred to by, this site is error free. This site may include links to websites of other government agencies or private groups. Our Agency and this website do not control such sites and are not responsible for their content. Reference to or links to any other group, product, service, or information does not mean our Agency or this website approves of that group, product, service, or information.

Additionally, while health information provided through this website may be a valuable resource for the public, it is not designed to offer medical advice. Talk with your doctor about medical care questions you may have.

Health
Outcome Data

No data available for this condition/procedure.

Health Encyclopedia

More Features

We Appreciate Your Feedback!
1. Did you find this information useful?
         Yes
         No
2. Would you recommend this website to family and friends?
         Yes
         No