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Facility/Provider Definitions

Facility/Provider Definitions


Abortion Clinics Homemaker and Companion Services
Adult Day Care Homes for Special Services
Adult Family Care Homes Hospice
Ambulatory Surgery Centers Hospital
Assisted Living Facilities Intermediate Care Facility for the Developmentally Disabled
Birth Center Multiphasic Health Test Center
Clinical Laboratory Nurse Registry
Community Mental Health Partial Hospital Program Nursing Home
Community Residential Home Organ and Tissue Procurement
Comprehensive Outpatient Rehabilitation Facility Portable X-Ray
Crisis Stabilization Unit Prescribed Pediatric Extended Care Center
End-Stage Renal Disease Rehabilitation Agency
Forensic Toxicology Laboratory Residential Treatment Center for Children and Adolescents
Health Care Clinic Residential Treatment Facility
Health Care Clinic Exemption Rural Health Clinic
Health Care Services Pool Skilled Nursing Unit
Home Health Agency Transitional Living Facility
Home Medical Equipment Provider

Accreditations

Emergency Actions

Licensure Status

Profit Status

Regulations for Facilities/Providers


Additional Hospital Information

Facility/Provider Definitions

Abortion Clinic– Abortion clinics are facilities for terminating pregnancies. This does not include a hospital or a doctor's office where abortions might be performed, but where this is not the primary purpose. Abortion clinics are licensed and surveyed by the State of Florida.

Authorized Procedures:

  • First Trimester – The first 12 weeks of pregnancy (the first 14 completed weeks from the last normal menstrual period). Abortion clinics with First Trimester denoted on their license may only perform abortions through the 12th week of pregnancy.
  • Second Trimester – That portion of pregnancy following the 12th week and extending through the 24th week of gestation.  Abortion Clinics with Second Trimester denoted on their license may only perform abortions through the 24th week of pregnancy.

Adult Day Care Center– Adult day care centers provide programs and services for adults who need a protective setting during the day. An adult day care center can be a freestanding program or services can be offered through a nursing home, assisted living facility, or hospital. The basic services include, but are not limited to:  social activities, self-care training, nutritional meals, a place to rest, and respite care.  Adult day care centers are licensed and surveyed by the State of Florida.

Adult Family Care Home– Adult family care homes provide full-time, family-type living in a private home for up to five elderly persons or adults with a disability, who are not related to the owner. The owner lives in the same house as the residents. The basic services include, but are not limited to:  housing and nutritional meals; help with the activities of daily living, like bathing, dressing, eating, walking, physical transfer, giving medications or helping residents give themselves medications; supervision of residents; arrange for health care services; provide or arrange for transportation to health care services; health monitoring; and social activities. Adult family care homes are licensed and surveyed by the State of Florida.

Medicaid Services:

  • Assistive Care Services – The Medicaid state plan is for recipients who live in a qualified adult family care home, assisted living facility, or residential treatment facility. Services include: assistance with activities of daily living (eating, bathing, walking, etc.), assistance with medications, shopping, making phone calls, and health support (observing the recipient’s well-being on a daily basis for any significant changes in appearance or behavior). To read more about Assistive Care Services view the Agency for Health Care Administration website.

Ambulatory Surgical Center – Ambulatory surgical centers (ASCs) are facilities that are not part of a hospital. An ASC provides elective surgical care where the patient is admitted to and discharged from the facility within the same working day. The patient does not stay overnight. Hospitals can have outpatient surgical units, but these units would be a part of the hospital license and would not require a separate ASC license. Ambulatory surgical centers are licensed and surveyed by the State of Florida.

Assisted Living Facility – Assisted living facilities (ALF) provide full-time living arrangements in the least restrictive and most home-like setting. The basic services include, but are not limited to: housing and nutritional meals; help with the activities of daily living, like bathing, dressing, eating, walking, physical transfer, giving medications or helping residents give themselves medications; arrange for health care services; provide or arrange for transportation to health care services; health monitoring; respite care; and social activities. Assisted living facilities are licensed and surveyed by the State of Florida.

Bed Types:

  • Extended Congregate Care (ECC) – An ALF with ECC beds may keep residents who become frailer than would normally be permitted in order for the resident to age in place. For example the facility can provide total help with bathing, dressing, grooming and toileting, and can provide or arrange for rehabilitative services, along with other services. However, this does not include 24-hour nursing services.
  • Optional State Supplementation (OSS) – The OSS listing refers to the number of beds available for residents receiving Optional State Supplementation. This is a cash assistance program provided through the Florida Department of Children and Families. It adds to a person's income to help pay for costs in an assisted living facility, mental health residential treatment facility or an adult family care home. To read more about Optional State Supplementation, and other funding sources, view the Florida Department of Elder Affairs website.
  • Private– Private Beds refers to the beds available for private pay residents.

Assisted Living Facility (ALF) Specialty Licenses:

  • Extended Congregate Care (ECC) – An ALF with this license can provide extended congregate care services (defined above, under Bed Types).
  • Limited Mental Health (LMH) – An ALF with this license can provide limited mental health services. This type of license must be obtained if an assisted living facility serves three or more mental health residents. Services must be provided for the special needs of these residents, along with the basic services of an assisted living facility. A facility with a limited mental health license must consult with the resident and the resident’s mental health case manager to develop and carry out a community living support plan.
  • Limited Nursing Services (LNS) - An ALF with this license offers some limited nursing services as defined by law, but does not include 24-hour nursing supervision.

Medicaid Services:

  • Assisted Living Waiver – The Medicaid waiver program is for recipients who live in a qualified assisted living facility. It provides case management, assisted living services, and incontinent supplies, if needed. This can include intermittent nursing, attendant care, personal care, homemaker and companion services, therapy (occupational, physical, speech), behavior management, medication administration, attendant call system, specialized medical equipment and supplies, and therapeutic social and recreational services. To read more about this program and other funding sources, visit the Florida Department of Elder Affairs website.
  • Assistive Care Services –The Medicaid state plan is for recipients who live in a qualified adult family care home, assisted living facility, or residential treatment facility. Services include: assistance with activities of daily living (eating, bathing, walking, etc.), assistance with medications, shopping, making phone calls, and health support (observing the recipient’s well-being on a daily basis for any significant changes in appearance or behavior). To read more about this program view the Agency for Health Care Administration website.
  • Developmental Disabilities Medicaid Waiver – This Medicaid waiver program provides services to people with developmental disabilities to allow them to live as independently as possible and avoid institutional placement. Services are provided in a person’s home or in a licensed residential facility, as well as in places like community centers, businesses, or therapists’ offices. Services can include nursing, therapy (occupational, physical, respiratory, and speech), dietitian, personal care assistance, companion services, durable medical equipment, adult day training, behavioral and mental health services, dental, respite care, environmental modifications, personal emergency response systems, supported employment, supported living coaching, transportation, and others. For more information visit the Agency for Persons with Disabilities website.

Nurse Availability
Nurse availability refers to the onsite accessibility of nursing staff within a facility. A facility’s nursing staff may include any practitioner licensed under Chapter 464, F.S., such as licensed practical nurses (LPNs), registered nurses (RNs), and/or advanced registered nurse practitioners (ARNPs). The different nurse availability designations are characterized as follows:

  • Direct 24hr: The facility provides residents with 24/7 onsite access to nurse staff that retain direct employment with the facility.
  • Direct Part Time: The facility provides residents with part time onsite access to nursing staff whom are directly employed by the facility.
  • 3rd Party 24hr: The facility provides residents with 24/7 onsite access to nursing staff who are not directly employed by the facility, but rather through a third party staffing agency.
  • 3rd Party Part Time: The facility provides residents with part time onsite access to nursing staff who are not directly employed by the facility, but rather through a third party staffing agency.
  • None: The facility does not have any onsite nurse availability.

Continuing Care Retirement Community (CCRC)
CCRCs provide a variety of senior housing options and services to meet the changing needs of its residents. Depending on the nature of the community, senior housing options can typically include independent living, an assisted living facility, and/or a nursing home. CCRCs allow residents to move from one level of care to another, as needed, and essentially eliminates the need for residents to move to a different community at a later age.


Birth Center – A birth center is a facility in which births are planned to occur away from the mother's place of residence following a normal, uncomplicated, low-risk pregnancy. It is not an ambulatory surgery center, a hospital, or located within a hospital. Birth centers are licensed and surveyed by the State of Florida.

Clinical Laboratory – A clinical laboratory performs one or more of the following services to provide information or materials for use in the diagnosis, prevention, or treatment of a disease or the identification or assessment of a medical or physical condition. Services include examination of fluids, tissue, cells, or other materials taken from the human body. All facilities, including physician offices, performing non-waived clinical laboratory testing, are required to get a federal Clinical Laboratory Improvement Amendment (CLIA) certificate and a state clinical laboratory license. Providers performing only waived testing who do not use a microscope are required to get a federal CLIA Certificate of Wavier. With the exception of providers doing only provider performed microscopy procedures, survey requirements apply only to those laboratories performing non-waived testing.

CLIA waived laboratories are not found in the Facility/Provider locator tool. The CLIA program has a look-up site at: www.cms.gov/Regulations-and-Guidance/Legislation/CLIA/CLIA_Laboratory_Demographic_Information.html

Community Mental Health Partial Hospital Program – This is a Medicare certification program for community mental health providers that provide services for mental illness and substance abuse disorders. Unless the program meets the requirement to be a licensed health care clinic, a licensed substance abuse program, or a licensed outpatient mental health program, there is no state license requirement for partial hospitalization programs for community mental health providers. For further information see the health care clinic definition (in this document) or contact the Department of Children and Families concerning substance abuse services and outpatient mental health services.

Community Residential Home – Community residential home, as defined by 419.001 F.S., means a dwelling unit licensed to serve residents who are clients of the Department of Elderly Affairs, the Agency for Persons with Disabilities, the Department of Juvenile Justice, or the Department of Children and Families or licensed by the Agency for Health Care Administration which provides a living environment for 7 to 14 unrelated residents who operate as the functional equivalent of a family, including such supervision and care by supportive staff as may be necessary to meet the physical, emotional, and social needs of the residents.

The community residential home providers listed on FloridaHealthFinder.gov are only those who are licensed by the Agency for Health Care Administration and those with less than 15 licensed beds. They include adult family care homes, assisted living facilities, intermediate care facilities for the developmentally disabled, residential treatment centers for adolescents and children or residential treatment facilities. Please be advised that local zoning authorities may have additional restrictions or requirements not under the jurisdiction of the Agency for Health Care Administration. Contact your local zoning authorities for any specific requirements. See also 419.001 F.S.

Comprehensive Outpatient Rehabilitation Facility – A comprehensive outpatient rehabilitation facility is a non-residential facility that provides diagnostic, therapeutic, and restorative services for the rehabilitation of injured, disabled, or sick persons, by or under the supervision of a physician. Comprehensive outpatient rehabilitation facilities are not required to be licensed by the state if they are Medicare certified. Comprehensive outpatient rehabilitation facilities that are not certified under the Medicare program may require licensure as a health care clinic.

Crisis Stabilization Unit – The purpose of these units is to examine, stabilize, and redirect people to the most appropriate and least restrictive treatment settings for their psychiatric needs. Crisis stabilization units include:

  • Crisis stabilization units (adult and children) provide brief psychiatric intervention, primarily for low-income individuals with acute psychiatric conditions. Inpatient stays average 3 to 14 days, resulting in return to the patient's own home or placement in a long-term mental health facility or other living arrangements.
  • Short-term residential treatment facilities provide a step-down service for adult residents (ages 18 and over) of crisis stabilization units needing a more extended, but less intensive level of active treatment for psychiatric conditions, usually with a stay of 90 days or less.

Both of these facility types are licensed by the State of Florida.  If you call any of the facilities on this list you will want to ask them if they are a crisis stabilization unit or a short-term residential treatment facility.

Services/Characteristics:

  • Addictions Receiving Facility – A crisis stabilization unit that provides integrated services to those who have a serious and acute mental illness or substance abuse impairment.
  • Adult Crisis Stabilization Unit – Described above. For adults age 18 and over. Each adult crisis stabilization unit must be designated as a Baker Act Receiving Facility.
  • Baker Act Receiving Facility – These facilities serve individuals who have been either involuntarily or voluntarily admitted. The Baker Act provides for an individual to receive emergency services and temporary, detention for mental health evaluation and treatment if it’s believed that the person has a mental illness and may be a harm to themselves or to others or without treatment the person is likely to suffer from neglect that poses a real and present threat of substantial harm to their well-being. The Baker Act can be initiated by judges, law enforcement officials, physicians or mental health professionals. Also a court may enter an ex parte order after a person who has personal knowledge of the individual’s behavior gives sworn testimony to the court.
  • Children’s Crisis Stabilization Unit – Described above. For children age 17 and younger. Each of these units must be designated as a Baker Act Receiving Facility.
  • Short Term Residential Treatment Facility – Described above. Each of these facilities must be affiliated with a designated Baker Act Receiving Facility.

End-Stage Renal Disease – This program offers dialysis services. When patients are diagnosed with End-Stage Renal Disease, they may receive dialysis which replaces kidney function by filtering blood to remove waste and extra fluids. The program can either be a freestanding facility or offered as an outpatient service through a hospital. End-Stage Renal Disease programs are not required to have a state license.

Forensic Toxicology Laboratory – A forensic toxicology laboratory examines specimens taken from the human body to look for the presence or absence of alcohol and certain drugs or their metabolites. The results of forensic toxicology testing are not used for clinical treatment, medical diagnosis, health assessment or disease prevention. In order to perform Drug-free workplace testing for state agencies and certain private employers, a forensic toxicology laboratory must be licensed by the State of Florida. Forensic toxicology laboratories that are not Drug-free workplace laboratories are not required to be licensed by the state.

Health Care Clinic – A health care clinic provides health care services to individuals for a fee. Health care clinics are licensed and surveyed by the State of Florida.

Services/Characteristics:

  • Mobile Clinic – A self-contained treatment or diagnostic unit that travels to set locations where the patients enter the unit for treatment.
  • MRI – A clinic that performs diagnostic services like magnetic resonance imaging (MRI).
  • Portable Equipment Provider – Business in which the provider performs services in multiple locations like doctor’s offices, or private residences.

Health Care Clinic Exemption – These are businesses that have gotten an exemption to the health care clinic license requirement. However, businesses that meet the exemption criteria are not required to have an official exemption, so there may be clinics that are exempt that are not listed here. The exemption criteria are listed in section 400.9905(4), Florida Statutes.

Health Care Services Pool – A health care services pool provides temporary employment of licensed, certified, or trained health care personnel to health care facilities, residential facilities, and agencies. Health care services pools are registered by the State of Florida.

Home Health Agency – A home health agency provides services to patients in private homes, assisted living facilities, and adult family care homes. Some of the services include nursing care; physical, occupational, respiratory, and speech therapy; home health aides; homemaker and companions; and medical equipment and supplies. Along with services in the home, an agency can also provide staffing services in nursing homes and hospitals. Home health agencies are licensed and surveyed by the State of Florida.

If it lists Medicare and/or Medicaid under Certification Status on Facility Locator that means the agency can serve Medicare and/or Medicaid patients.

Home Medical Equipment Provider – A home medical equipment provider sells or rents medical equipment and services for use in the home. Home medical equipment includes any product as defined by the Federal Drug Administration's Drugs, Devices and Cosmetics Act; any products reimbursed under the Medicare Part B Durable Medical Equipment benefits; or any products reimbursed under the Florida Medicaid durable medical equipment program. Service includes managing the equipment and teaching consumers in its use. Home medical equipment providers are licensed and surveyed by the State of Florida.

Services/Characteristics:

  • Respiratory Equipment
  • Mobility Aids
  • Ambulatory Aids
  • Sickroom Setup
  • Disposable Supplies

Homemaker and Companion Services– Homemakers and companions companies provide housekeeping, prepare and serve meals, help with shopping, routine household chores, companionship in the client's home, and can take the client to appointments and other outings. By law, homemakers and companions may not provide hands-on personal care, such as help with bathing, and cannot give medications. Homemaker and companion agencies are registered by the State of Florida. However, individuals who work on their own, with no other workers helping them are not required to be registered.

Homes for Special Services – A home for special services is a residential facility where specialized health care services are provided, including personal and custodial care, but not full-time nursing services. Home for special services are licensed by the State of Florida.

Hospice– A hospice provides services in a patient's residence or in a hospice facility for patients with a diagnosis of a terminal illness. They provide a coordinated program of professional services, including pain management and counseling for patients; nursing, physician, therapy, and social work services; counseling and support for family members and friends of the patient; and other support services. Hospices are licensed and surveyed by the State of Florida.

Hospital– A hospital provides a range of health care services more extensive than those required for room, board, personal services, and general nursing care, and offers facilities and beds for use beyond 24 hours by individuals requiring medical, surgical, psychiatric, testing, and diagnostic services; and treatment for illness, injury, disease, pregnancy, etc. Also available are laboratory and X-ray services, and treatment facilities for surgery or obstetrical care, or special services like burn treatment centers. Hospitals are licensed and surveyed by the State of Florida. Hospitals are subject to annual Life-Safety surveys by the State of Florida. Non-accredited hospitals are also subject to annual licensure inspections.

Hospital Bed Types:

  • Acute Care – These are beds used to provide short-term medical treatment for patients having an acute illness or injury or recovering from surgery or childbirth.
  • Adult Psychiatric – These are beds for the exclusive use of inpatient psychiatric services to patients aged 18 years and older, whose sole diagnosis or principal diagnosis is a psychiatric disorder.
  • Adult Substance Abuse – These are beds for the exclusive use of inpatient substance abuse services to patients aged 18 years and older, whose sole diagnosis or principal diagnosis is a substance abuse disorder.
  • Child Psychiatric – These are beds for the exclusive use of inpatient psychiatric services to patients under the age of 18, whose sole diagnosis or principal diagnosis is a psychiatric disorder.
  • Child/Adolescent Substance Abuse – These are beds for the exclusive use of providing hospital inpatient substance abuse services to patients under the age of 18, whose sole diagnosis or principal diagnosis is a substance abuse disorder.
  • Comprehensive Medical Rehabilitation – These are beds for providing integrated intensive care services provided by a coordinated multidisciplinary team to patients with severe physical disabilities, such as stroke, spinal cord injury, congenital deformity, amputation, major multiple trauma, hip fracture, brain injury, polyarthritis (including rheumatoid arthritis), neurological disorders (including multiple sclerosis, motor neuron diseases, polyneuropathy, muscular dystrophy, and Parkinson's disease), and burns.
  • Intensive Residential Treatment Program – These beds are for the diagnosis and treatment of patients under the age of 18 having psychiatric disorders in order to restore them to an optimal level of functioning.
  • Long Term Care – These are acute care beds located in a hospital that has been designated a Long Term Care Hospital and has an average inpatient length of stay of greater than 25 days. Long term acute care beds are used to treat medically complex patients requiring specialized acute care services who would potentially stay in a short term acute care hospital for an extended length of time. This includes a wide range of conditions all with severe medical complications that together contribute to the overall condition of the patient and require acute treatment (not treatment of chronic stable conditions).
  • Neonatal Intensive Care Unit Level 2 (NICU) – These beds are used for the care of moderately ill or recuperating infants who are over their acute phase of illness.
  • Neonatal Intensive Care Unit Level 3(NICU) – These beds are used for the care of the most complex and severely ill babies.
  • Skilled Nursing Unit – These beds are typically used to provide only short term care and rehabilitation services.
  • To read more click Additional Hospital Information.

Intermediate Care Facility for the Developmentally Disabled – This residential facility provides services by an interdisciplinary team to increase a client's independence and prevent loss of abilities. They are licensed and surveyed by the State of Florida.

Multiphasic Health Test Center – Multiphasic health testing centers are freestanding facilities that collect specimens from the human body for testing at a licensed clinical laboratory and provide certain health testing services such as height, weight and blood pressure measurements, limited audio and visual testing, X-rays or electrocardiograms. A multiphasic health testing center may serve the general public or contracted employers at either a fixed location or a mobile facility. Multiphasic health test centers are licensed and surveyed by the State of Florida.

Nurse Registry– A nurse registry acts as employment agency between an individual patient and nurses, nursing assistants, home health aides, companions and homemakers for services in the patient's home.Nurse registries also provide temporary staff for nursing homes, hospitals, and other businesses. Each individual health care worker is an independent contractor and is not a direct employee of the nurse registry.  Nurse registries are licensed and surveyed by the State of Florida.

Nursing Home – A nursing home provides nursing, personal, custodial, and rehabilitative care. Nursing homes, sometimes called skilled nursing facilities, are freestanding, which means they are not part of a hospital. Nursing homes are licensed and surveyed by the State of Florida.

Nursing Home Bed Types:

  • Community Beds - are nursing home beds available to serve persons in the community
  • Pediatric Beds - are community beds designated for use by children
  • Private Beds - represent the number of beds in single occupancy rooms
  • Rooms (2, 3 or 4 Beds) - represent the numbers of rooms that contain 2, 3 or 4 beds
  • Sheltered Beds - are nursing home beds located within a continuing care retirement community available to serve persons living in the retirement community

Special Services/Characteristics:

  • Gold Seal Nursing Home - The Governor’s Panel on Excellence in Long Term Care recognizes these nursing homes as meeting high standards and quality of care. The Gold Seal is awarded for a two-year period to those facilities that meet or exceed the Gold Seal standards, as mandated by Section.400.235, F.S., and 59A-4.201, F.A.C.
  • Special Programs and Services – 24-hour RN coverage; adult day care; Alzheimer’s care; Dialysis; Eden Alternative; HIV care; Hospice care; JCAHO (Joint Commission) accredited dementia care, long-term care program, and sub-acute care program; pediatric; pet therapy; respite care; therapeutic spa; tracheotomy; ventilator dependent; water therapy; weight training; and yoga.

Watch List Information:

The Watch List identifies nursing homes that are operating under bankruptcy protection or met the criteria for a conditional status during the past 30 months. A conditional status indicates that a facility did not meet, or correct upon follow-up, minimum standards at the time of an inspection. Immediate action is taken if a facility poses a threat to resident health or safety. Under Florida law, nursing homes have a right to challenge state sanctions. Facilities challenging a conditional license are noted as "under appeal." Watch List information is subject to change as appeals are processed.

Occupancy Rate:

Within 45 days after the end of each calendar quarter, nursing homes report to the agency, or the Local Health Council, the number patient days in the quarter. The occupancy rate is calculated as the average percentage of patient days/total available bed days over the most recently available 6 month period. Patient days are the total number of days beds were occupied by residents in the facility. The occupancy rate excludes nursing home beds for children only; all nursing homes operated by the Department of Veterans' Affairs, and sheltered beds in Continuing Care Retirement Communities (beds reserved for retirement community members).

Lowest Daily Charge:

This is the daily rate for a semi-private room for a self-pay, skilled care, new resident. This information is self-reported by the facilities at the time of license renewal. Facilities are asked to report the lowest rate if there was a range. If the facility did not have semi-private rooms, they report the private room rate.

Special Services:

Many nursing homes provide special services. Inquire at the facility if you require another special service. Each of the special services listed was self-reported by the facility at the time of re-licensure; please contact the facility for current services offered.

  • Adult Day Care - Adult day care offers therapeutic programs of health services and social activities such as leisure activities, self-care training, rest, nutritional services, and respite care for less than 24 hours a day.
  • Respite Care - Respite care is a short stay (normally not more than two weeks) that allows the home caregiver a break from caring for someone who needs constant supervision (24 hours a day).
  • Alzheimer's Care - Special accommodations are made for residents with Alzheimer's, dementia, or related diseases. Such accommodations include separate living areas and specific daily activities for the residents. The facility has staff trained in the care of patients with Alzheimer's, dementia or related diseases.
  • Ventilator Dependent - The facility accepts and is able to properly care for residents who are dependent on a ventilator.
  • Tracheotomy Care - The facility accepts and is able to properly care for residents who require tracheotomy care.
  • Dialysis Services - The facility accepts and is able to properly care for residents who require dialysis.
  • Pediatric Care - The facility accepts and the nursing staff has been trained to care for residents who are under 18-years-old.
  • Pet Therapy - Pets are a regular part of the residents' therapy.
  • 24-Hour RN Coverage - The facility has a registered nurse on staff at all times.
  • Eden Alternative - The facility provides an Eden alternative living environment.
  • Yoga - The facility provides yoga sessions.
  • Water Therapy - The facility provides water therapy exercises.
  • Weight Train - The facility helps residents maintain muscle strength with weight training exercises.
  • HIV - The facility accepts residents who are HIV positive.
  • Hospice - The facility provides hospice care.

Organ and Tissue Procurement – There are three types of organ and tissue procurement organizations: Organ Procurement Organizations (OPOs), Eye Banks and Tissue Banks. OPOs must also be federally designated by the Secretary of the United States Department of Health and Human Services and are responsible for using the national United Network of Organ Sharing’s (UNOS) registry to medically and physically match organs, such as the heart, lungs, kidneys, or liver, from a patient who has died with an individual awaiting a life-saving transplant. An Eye Bank is an entity involved in the recovery, processing, storage or distribution of eye tissue that will be used for transplantation. A Tissue Bank is an entity that is involved in the recovery, processing, storage, or distribution of human tissue, such as bone, skin, or cartilage, which will be used for transplantation. Organ and tissue procurement organizations, including those located outside of Florida that provide eye and other tissue types to Florida’s transplanting physicians, are certified by the State of Florida.

Portable X-Ray – A portable x-ray provider gives diagnostic x-ray tests in a patient’s own home, a nursing home, or a hospital that does not provide x-ray services for its patients directly but arranges for services with a portable x-ray provider. Some portable x-ray providers may need a health care clinic license. See the health care clinic definition for further information.

Prescribed Pediatric Extended Care Center – A prescribed pediatric extended care center provides basic nonresidential services to three or more medically dependent or technologically dependent children with complex medical conditions that require continual care. The comprehensive care includes medical, nursing, psychosocial, and developmental therapies. These centers are licensed and surveyed by the State of Florida.

Rehabilitation Agency – A rehabilitation agency provides a multidisciplinary program to help improve the physical function of disabled individuals by creating a team of specialized rehabilitation staff. The rehabilitation agency provides at least physical therapy or speech-language pathology services and social or vocational adjustment services. Rehabilitation agencies are not required to be licensed by the state if they are Medicare certified. Rehab agencies that are not certified under the Medicare program may require licensure as a health care clinic.

Residential Treatment Center for Children and Adolescents – These are 24 hour residential programs, including therapeutic group homes that provide mental health treatment and services to children under the age of 18 who have been diagnosed as having mental, emotional, or behavioral disorders. Residential treatment centers are licensed by the State of Florida.

Type:

  • Psychiatric Residential Treatment Facility - A non-hospital facility with a State Medicaid provider agreement to provide the inpatient services benefit to Medicaid-eligible children and adolescents.
  • Therapeutic Group Home – A 24-hour residential program providing community-based mental health treatment and mental health support services in a home-like setting to no more than 12 children who meet admission criteria.

Residential Treatment Facility – A residential treatment facility provides long-term residential care with coordinated mental health services for adults (18 years or older) diagnosed with a serious and persistent major mental illness. A state license covers five levels of care that range from having full-time nurses on staff to independent apartments that receive only weekly staff contact. Residential treatment facilities are licensed and surveyed by the State of Florida.

Residential Treatment Facility Types:

  • Level IA and Level IB – Provide the highest level of care with a structured group treatment setting with 24 hours per day, 7 days per week supervision for residents who have major skill deficits in activities of daily living and independent living, and need intensive staff supervision, support and assistance. Nursing supervision is provided 24 hours per day, 7 days per week, however, nursing services are limited to medication administration, monitoring vital signs, first aid and individual assistance with ambulation, bathing, dressing, eating and grooming. The minimum staffing is 1:10 staff to resident ratio with never less than 2 staff on site at all times.
  • Level II – Level II facilities provide a structured group treatment setting with 24 hour per day, 7 days per week supervision for five or more residents who range from those who have significant deficits in independent living skills and need extensive supervision, support, and assistance, to those who have achieved a limited capacity for independent living, but who require frequent supervision, support and assistance. Level II facilities maintain a minimum of 1:15 staff to resident ratio with never less than one staff on site when residents are present during normal waking hours. During sleeping hours, a minimum of 1:22 staff to resident ratio is required.
  • Level III – Level III facilities consist of collocated apartment units with an apartment or office for staff who provided on-site assistance 24 hours per day, 7 days per week. The residents have a moderate capacity for independent living. Level III facilities maintain a minimum 1:20 staff to resident ratio with never less than one staff on site when residents are present during normal waking hours. During normal sleeping hours, a minimum of 1:40 staff to resident ratio is required.
  • Level IV – Level IV facilities provide a semi-independent, minimally structured group setting for 4 or more residents who have most of the skills required for independent living and require minimal staff support. Level IV facilities may have less than 24 hours per day, 7 days per week on site supervision; however, on-call staff must be available at all times. Staff is required to have a minimum of weekly on site contact with residents.
  • Level V – Level V facilities provide the least amount of care and supervision. Level V facilities provide a semi-independent, minimally structured apartment setting for 1 to 4 residents who have adequate independent living skills and require minimal staff support. Level V facilities may have less than 24 hours per day, 7 days per week on site supervision; however, on-call staff must be available at all times. Staff is required to have a minimum of weekly on site contact with residents.

Medicaid Services:Medicaid Services:

  • Assistive Care Services – The Medicaid state plan is for recipients who live in a qualified adult family care home, assisted living facility, or residential treatment facility. Services include: assistance with activities of daily living (eating, bathing, walking, etc.), assistance with medications, shopping, making phone calls, and health support (observing the recipient’s well-being on a daily basis for any significant changes in appearance or behavior). To read more about Assistive Care Services view the Agency for Health Care Administration website.

Rural Health Clinic – A rural health clinic must be designated by the Florida Department of Health as located in a rural and medically under-served area and employ a mid-level practitioner for 50% of the time of its operating hours. The clinic provides care for rural residents by paying primary care practitioners a better rate to those who choose to practice in a rural setting. There are two types of rural health clinics. An independent rural health clinic is a freestanding practice that is not part of a hospital, nursing home, or home health agency. A provider-based rural health clinic is a part of a hospital, nursing home, or home health agency. Some rural health clinics may require a health care clinic license. See the health care clinic definition for further information.

Skilled Nursing Unit – Skilled nursing units are based in hospitals, either housed inside the hospital or in a separate building. They typically provide only short term care and rehabilitation services. The skilled nursing unit does not have a separate license because it is part of the hospital license. See the hospital definition for further information.

Transitional Living Facility – A transitional living facility provides services to persons with a spinal-cord-injury or head-injury.  Specialized health care services include rehabilitative services, community reentry training, aids for independent living, counseling, and other services. This term does not include a hospital licensed under chapter 395 or any federally operated hospital or facility. A transitional living facility is licensed by the State of Florida.

Accreditations:

Accreditation is provided by professional associations or nongovernmental agencies. Health care facilities and providers who voluntarily choose to seek accreditation must meet standards established by the accrediting organization. You may be able to find quality of care comparison tools through the following accrediting organizations.

  • Accreditation Association for Ambulatory Health Care – The Accreditation Association for Ambulatory Health Care, also known as AAAHC or the Accreditation Association is a private, non-profit organization formed in 1979. Their goal is to develop standards to advance and promote patient safety, quality and value for ambulatory health care through peer-based accreditation processes, education and research. Accreditation is ultimately awarded to organizations that are found to be in compliance with the AAAHC standards. AAAHC currently accredits a wide variety of ambulatory health care settings, including ambulatory and office based surgery centers and managed care organizations.
  • The American Association for Accreditation of Ambulatory Surgery Facilities, Inc. – The American Association for Accreditation of Ambulatory Surgery Facilities (AAAASF) was established in 1980 to develop an accreditation program to standardize and improve the quality of medical and surgical care in ambulatory surgery facilities while assuring the public of high standards for patient care and safety in an accredited facility. AAAASF accreditation is recognized by the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services, but has not met Florida licensure requirements for ambulatory surgical centers.
  • Commission for the Accreditation of Birth Centers – The Commission for the Accreditation of Birth Centers (CABC) is currently the only accrediting body whose goal is unique to birth centers. Centers that are accredited by the CABC must demonstrate adherence to standards of quality above that of basic licensure and that the center’s care is consistent with the philosophy of the American Association of Birth Centers.
  • Commission on Accreditation of Rehabilitation Facilities – The Commission on Accreditation of Rehabilitation Facilities (CARF) was founded in 1966 and is an independent, nonprofit organization. CARF reviews and grants accreditation services nationally and internationally on request of a facility or program. It is their mission to promote the quality, value, and optimal outcomes of services through a consultative accreditation process that centers on enhancing the lives of the persons served. CARF currently accredits a wide variety of providers including adult day services, assisted living, nursing homes, behavioral health, child and youth services, medical rehabilitation (hospitals), opioid drug treatment programs, as well as suppliers of durable medical equipment, prosthetics, orthotics and supplies.
  • Council on Accreditation – The Council on Accreditation (COA) is an international, independent, not-for-profit, child- and family-service and behavioral healthcare accrediting organization. COA was founded in 1977 by the Child Welfare League of America and Family Service America (now the Alliance for Children and Families). COA currently accredits over 45 different service areas. Among the service areas are behavioral health, substance abuse treatment, adult day care, services for the homeless, foster care, and inter-country adoption. An organization seeking COA accreditation is evaluated against best-practice standards, which are developed using a consensus model with input from a wide range of service providers, funders, experts, policymakers and consumers.
  • DNV Healthcare, Inc. - DNV Healthcare is the hospital accreditation program of Det Norske Veritas. DNV Healthcare received deeming authority from the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services in 2008 and is also recognized as meeting the Florida licensure requirements for hospitals.
  • Healthcare Facilities Accreditation Program - Healthcare Facilities Accreditation Program HFAP is the accreditation arm of the American Osteopathic Association. Originally created in 1945 to conduct an objective review of services provided by osteopathic hospitals, HFAP has maintained its deeming authority continuously since the inception of CMS in 1965 and meets or exceeds the standards required by CMS/Medicare to provide accreditation to all hospitals, ambulatory surgical facilities, mental health facilities, physical rehabilitation facilities, clinical laboratories and critical access hospitals.
  • The Joint Commission – The Joint Commission (previously known as JCAHO) is an independent, not-for-profit organization which accredits and certifies more than 16,000 health care organizations and programs in the United States. The Joint Commission’s mission is to continuously improve the safety and quality of care provided to the public through the provision of health care accreditation and related services that support performance improvement in health care organizations. The Joint Commission provides accreditation services for the following types of organizations: General, psychiatric, children’s and rehabilitation hospitals; Critical access hospitals; Medical equipment services, hospice services and other home care organizations; Nursing homes and other long term care facilities; Behavioral health care organizations and addiction services; Rehabilitation centers, group practices, office-based surgeries and other ambulatory care providers; and Independent or freestanding laboratories.
  • National Committee for Quality Assurance – The National Committee for Quality Assurance is a private, not-for-profit accrediting organization that was founded in 1990. NCQA utilizes a rigorous and comprehensive evaluation process which assesses the quality of the key systems and processes that define health care organizations. NCQA offers accreditation programs for managed behavioral healthcare organizations, health plans, wellness and health promotion, managed care organizations, preferred provider organizations, and disease management.

Emergency Actions:

  • Moratorium - The licensee is prohibited from admitting new patients or residents due to an emergency action issued by the Agency. Services can continue to be offered to residents/participants already being served, but new residents/participants cannot be admitted until a Final Order is issued.
  • Suspension - The license is temporarily suspended due to an emergency action issued by the Agency. During suspension the provider cannot operate.

Licensure Status

  • Active/Licensed/Registered – License is active and services can be provided.
  • Denied – The initial license application is denied.
  • Inactive – An inactive license may be issued to a health care provider when the provider is currently licensed, does not have a provisional license, and will be temporarily unable to provide services but is reasonably expected to resume services within 12 months.
  • In Review – The Agency has received the license renewal application, but processing is not yet complete. Services can be provided.
  • Litigation – The Agency has initiated action to deny or revoke a license or initial application for a license. The action can be appealed and services can continue to be offered, by those providers that already have a license, until a Final Order is issued.

Profit Status

  • For-Profit – A for-profit facility offers services or goods and operates to make money. The net earnings go to the benefit of private shareholders or individuals, as well as to maintain and develop the facility.
  • Not-for-Profit – A not-for-profit facility operates not to make money, but to serve the public good. Any net earnings by a not-for-profit are used by the not-for-profit facility for the purposes of which it was established. The net earnings do not benefit any private shareholder or individual.

Additional Hospital Information:

Baker Act Receiving Facility – These facilities serve individuals who have been either involuntarily or voluntarily admitted. The Baker Act provides for an individual to receive emergency services and temporary, detention for mental health evaluation and treatment if it’s believed that the person has a mental illness and may be a harm to themselves or to others or without treatment the person is likely to suffer from neglect that poses a real and present threat of substantial harm to their well-being. The Baker Act can be initiated by judges, law enforcement officials, physicians or mental health professionals. Also a court may enter an ex parte order after a person who has personal knowledge of the individual’s behavior gives sworn testimony to the court.

Emergency Department - any department or facility of a hospital that is held out to the public as providing emergency services, which includes a medical screening examination and evaluation by a physician or by other appropriate personnel under the supervision of a physician, to determine if an emergency medical condition exists and, if it does, the care, treatment, or surgery by a physician necessary to relieve or eliminate the emergency medical condition, within the service capability of the facility.

Emergency Services - an inventory of specific services that are available 24 hours per day, 7 days per week through the emergency department, either directly or by agreement with another provider unless an exemption to continuous availability has been granted by the Agency. For a list of hospitals with emergency services exemptions, click here.

Organ Transplant Programs - Surgical and support services through which one or more of the following types of solid organ transplants are provided: heart, kidney liver, lung, pancreas, and intestines. Adult programs are for patients 15 years of age and older and pediatric programs are for patients under the age of 15. Refer to hospital Special Services for bone marrow transplantation.

Hospital Programs

  • Burn Unit - A burn unit is a particular unit within a hospital with its own separate space that is equipped and staffed to provide specialized care solely for severely burned persons. A burn unit is required to comply with the guidelines published by the American College of Surgeons, Committee on Trauma and proof of compliance must be verified by the American Burn Association.
  • Comprehensive Stroke Centers - Comprehensive stroke centers are hospitals that are designated by the Agency for Health Care Administration to meet Florida regulation requirements for excellence in promoting better outcomes for stroke patients. The hospital must attest that it has received initial Primary Stroke Center designation as well as certain additional criteria. In addition to the requirements for a primary stroke center, a comprehensive stroke center must have health care personnel with clinical expertise in a number of disciplines, advanced diagnostic capabilities, provide neurological surgery and endovascular interventions, a specialized infrastructure (includes emergency medical services, referral and triage, specialized inpatient units, post stroke rehabilitation, educational needs, professional standards for nursing and research), and a quality improvement program which includes clinical outcomes measurement. This certification shows that the hospital provides the most comprehensive services to achieve long-term success in improving outcomes for stroke patients.
  • Inpatient Diagnostic Cardiac Catheterization - Catheterization laboratory services for adult inpatients in which a catheter is inserted into one or more heart chambers for the purpose of diagnosing cardiovascular diseases.
  • Level 1 Adult Cardiovascular Service - Cardiovascular services that include adult diagnostic cardiac catheterization and the provision of percutaneous coronary intervention (angioplasty).
  • Level 2 Adult Cardiovascular Service - Cardiovascular services that include adult diagnostic cardiac catheterization, the provision of percutaneous coronary intervention (angioplasty), and the provision of coronary artery bypass graft surgery (open heart surgery).
  • Provisional Burn Unit - A designation of provisional is assigned to a burn unit when the applicant indicates the hospital is in partial compliance with the guidelines published by the American College of Surgeons, Committee on Trauma, but has not received initial verification from the American Burn Association.
  • Primary Stroke Centers - Primary stroke centers are hospitals that are designated by the Agency for Health Care Administration to meet Florida regulation requirements for excellence in promoting better outcomes for stroke patients. The hospital has to attest that it is certified as a Primary Stroke Center by The Joint Commission (an accrediting organization) or that the program meets the criteria applicable to primary stroke centers as outlined by The Joint Commission Disease-Specific Care Manual. This certification shows that the hospital provides services to achieve long-term success in improving outcomes for stroke patients. For further information on The Joint Commission Primary Stroke Center Certification Program visit The Joint Commission .

Special Designations

  • Critical Access Hospitals - A critical access hospital, as defined in section 408.07 (15), Florida Statutes, is a small rural hospital of 25 beds or less that is reimbursed for 101 percent of the cost of providing services to Medicare patients as a means to stabilize and improve access to hospital care in rural areas. A critical access hospital must provide 24 hour emergency, outpatient, and limited inpatient services, and must meet other requirements to support the services provided. The Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services designates which hospitals are critical access hospitals.
  • Further information can be found on the webpage for the Florida Department of Health’s Office of Rural Health.
  • Family Practice Teaching Hospitals - A family practice teaching hospital is a freestanding, community-based hospital that offers a 3-year family practice residency program accredited through the Residency Review Committee of the Accreditation Council of Graduate Medical Education or the Council on Postdoctoral Training of the American Osteopathic Association.
  • Statutory Rural Hospitals - A rural hospital, as defined in section 395.602, Florida Statutes, is an acute care hospital licensed under Chapter 395 of the Florida Statutes, having 100 or fewer licensed beds and an emergency room. In addition, the hospital is in a county with a population density of no greater than 100 persons per square mile and is at least one of the following: 1) the sole hospital provider in the county; 2) at least 30 minutes travel time from another acute care hospital in the same county; 3) a hospital supported by a tax district or sub-district; 4) a hospital with a service area as defined in section 408.07 (43) (d), Florida Statutes; or 5) a critical access hospital. Further information can be found on the webpage for the Florida Department of Health’s Office of Rural Health.
  • Statutory Teaching Hospitals - Any Florida hospital officially affiliated with an accredited Florida medical school which exhibits activity in the area of graduate medical education as reflected by at least seven different graduate medical education programs accredited by the Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education or the Council on Postdoctoral Training of the American Osteopathic Association and the presence of 100 or more full-time equivalent resident physicians. The Secretary of the Agency for Health Care Administration shall be responsible for determining which hospitals meet this definition.

Special Services - Additional hospital services not otherwise categorized as a licensed program or transplant service.

  • Adult Inpatient Cardiac Catheterization - Cardiovascular services limited to scheduled diagnostic procedures, but also authorized to perform emergency percutaneous coronary interventions pursuant to s. 408.036(3)(n), Florida Statutes.
  • Adult Autologous Bone Marrow Transplant Program - Hospital services in which bone marrow is collected from a patient 15 years old or older for the purpose of administering to the same patient at a later date.
  • Adult Bone Marrow Transplant Program - Hospital services in which bone marrow is collected from a donor for the purpose of administering to a patient 15 years old or older.
  • Adult Open Heart - Hospital surgical services used to treat conditions such as congenital heart defects and heart and coronary artery diseases on patients 15 years old and older.
  • Pediatric Autologous Bone Marrow Transplant Program - Hospital services in which bone marrow is collected from a patient under 15 years old for the purpose of administering to the same patient at a later date.
  • Pediatric Bone Marrow Transplant Program - Hospital services in which bone marrow is collected from a donor for the purpose of administering to a patient under 15 years old.
  • Pediatric Open Heart - Hospital surgical services used to treat conditions such as congenital heart defects and heart and coronary artery diseases on patients under 15 years old.
  • Pediatric Inpatient Cardiac Catheterization - Cardiovascular services limited to scheduled diagnostic procedures for patients under 15 years old.

Trauma Center – A hospital is designated as a trauma center by the Florida Department of Health (DOH). The hospital has to apply to DOH and show substantial compliance with the requirements as defined in section 395.4025, Florida Statutes. Trauma services are for patients who have experienced a single or multi-system injury due to blunt or penetrating means or burns that require immediate medical intervention or treatment.

  • A Level 1 trauma center treats trauma patients; has formal research and education programs for the improvement of trauma care; and serves as a resource to Level 2 trauma centers, pediatric trauma centers, and general hospitals through shared outreach, education, and quality improvement activities. A Level 1 trauma center also meets the designation of a pediatric trauma center and serves as such.
  • A Level II trauma center treats trauma patients; serves as a resource to general hospitals through shared outreach, education, and quality improvement activities; and participates in an inclusive system of trauma care.
  • A pediatric trauma center treats pediatric trauma patients who are 15 years of age or younger.
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